MedFusion Clinic

421 Stonewood Dr. Broken Arrow OK 74012

Tel: 918.872.8822

All rights Reserved. ®  Copyright 2019 ©

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Adult Immunizations

Recommended Vaccines

Immunizations are not just for children. Protection from some childhood vaccines can wear off over time. You may also be at risk for vaccine-preventable disease due to your age, job, lifestyle, travel, or health conditions. All adults need immunizations to help them prevent getting and spreading serious diseases that could result in poor health, missed work, medical bills, and not being able to care for family.

At MedFusion we administer full array of adult immunizations recommended by CDC. All adults need a seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine every year. Flu vaccine is especially important for people with chronic health conditions, pregnant women, and older adults. Every adult should get the Tdap vaccine once if they did not receive it as an adolescent to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years. In addition, women should get the Tdap vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks.

Adults 19 - 25 Years Old

In addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Td or Tdap vaccine (Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), you should also get:

  • HPV vaccine which protects against the human papilloma viruses that causes most cervical cancers, anal cancer, and genital warts. It is recommended for:

    • women up to age 26 years

    • men up to age 21 years

    • men ages 22-26 who have sex with men

Some vaccines may be recommended for adults because of particular job or school-related requirements, health conditions, lifestyle or other factors. For example, some states require students entering colleges and universities to be vaccinated against certain diseases like meningitis due to increased risk among college students living in residential housing. Talk with your doctor or other healthcare professional to find out which vaccines are recommended for you at your next medical appointment.

Adults 50+ Years Old

Almost 1 out of every 3 people in the United States will develop shingles in their lifetime. Your risk of shingles increases as you grow older. Additionally, over 60 percent of seasonal flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 years and older. As we get older, our immune systems tend to weaken over time, putting us at higher risk for certain diseases. This is why, in addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), you should also get:

  • Shingles vaccine, which protects against shingles and the complications from the disease (recommended for healthy adults 50 years and older)

  • Pneumococcal vaccines, which protect against pneumococcal disease, including infections in the lungs and bloodstream (recommended for all adults over 65 years old, and for adults younger than 65 years who have certain chronic health conditions)

Talk with your doctor or other healthcare professional to find out which vaccines are recommended for you at your next medical appointment.

Adults with Heart Conditions

All adults need a seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Td or Tdap vaccine (Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) but there may be additional vaccines recommended for you. Learn more about which vaccines you may need if you have any of these conditions:

  • Asplenia

  • Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2

  • Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease

  • HIV Infection

  • Liver Disease

  • Lung Disease including Asthma

  • Renal Disease

  • Weakened Immune System

Talk with your doctor or other healthcare professional to find out which vaccines are recommended for you based on your specific health status, age, and lifestyle.

Pregnant

If you are pregnant, the two vaccines you’ll need during each pregnancy are:

 

  • Tdap vaccine (between 27 and 36 weeks of pregnancy — preferably during the earlier part of this time period) to help protect against whooping cough, and

  • The flu shot (during flu season, which is October through May) to help protect against influenza.

Healthcare Workers

Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk for exposure to serious, and sometimes deadly, diseases.

 

If you work directly with patients or handle material that could spread infection, you should get appropriate vaccines to reduce the chance that you will get or spread vaccine-preventable diseases. In addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and TDAP

  • Hepatitis B: If you don’t have documented evidence of a complete hepB vaccine series, or if you don’t have an up-to-date blood test that shows you are immune to hepatitis B (i.e., no serologic evidence of immunity or prior vaccination) then you should get the 3-dose series (dose #1 now, #2 in 1 month, #3 approximately 5 months after #2). Get anti-HBs serologic tested 1–2 months after dose #3.

  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, & Rubella): If you were born in 1957 or later and have not had the MMR vaccine, or if you don’t have an up-to-date blood test that shows you are immune to measles, mumps, and rubella (i.e., no serologic evidence of immunity or prior vaccination), get 2 doses of MMR, 4 weeks apart.

  • Varicella (Chickenpox): If you have not had chickenpox (varicella), if you haven’t had varicella vaccine, or if you don’t have an up-to-date blood test that shows you are immune to varicella (i.e., no serologic evidence of immunity or prior vaccination) get 2 doses of varicella vaccine, 4 weeks apart.

  • Meningococcal: Those who are routinely exposed to isolates of N. meningitis should get one dose.

International Traveller

If you are planning on visiting or living abroad you may need certain vaccinations.

  • STEP 1: Make sure you are up-to-date with all recommended vaccinations. 

  • STEP 2: Visit the CDC Travel Health site for more information about recommendations and requirements for the locations you will be visiting during your travel.

  • STEP 3: Make an appointment to get recommended vaccines at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip. Planning ahead will give you enough time to build up immunity and get best protection from vaccines that may require multiple doses.